FCC gives Telehealth $400M Boost

WASHINGTON | January 10, 2013

TelehealthThe Federal Communications Commission will make $400 million available annually to healthcare providers to expand the development of broadband telehealth networks from a pilot to a permanent program. The pilot program has supported 50 provider healthcare networks in 38 states.

The telehealth networks will link urban medical centers to rural clinics or offer instant access to electronic health records(EHRs). The agency will begin accepting applications for the grants in late summer, according to the Jan. 7 announcement by FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski.

[See also: Proposed bill would expand telehealth services, bolster federal payouts.]

The fund will enable thousands of new providers across the country to benefit from connectivity to improve the delivery of care and dramatically cut costs for both hospitals and the FCC’s Universal Service Fund, which underwrites advanced telecommunications services. Many other providers will have the means to upgrade their connections.

The Healthcare Connect Fund program builds on the agency’s Rural Healthcare pilot program. For years, the FCC’s primary healthcare program has made it difficult for hospitals serving rural patients to get high bandwidth connections needed for modern telemedicine by limiting the services eligible for funding and by making it hard for groups to effectively bargain for the lowest cost service, the agency said.

The fund will enable patients at hospitals and clinics around the country to access specialists at major health centers through telemedicine and support the exchange of electronic health records, which can lead to better coordination of care and lower costs. The program will also encourage formation of state and regional healthcare consortia to save costs and expand access to healthcare.

[See also: Telehealth poised to take center stage.]

The FCC fund will offer a 65-percent discount on broadband services, equipment, connections to research and education networks, and provider-constructed and owned facilities if cost-effective. Healthcare providers will contribute 35 percent of the costs.

Healthcare organizations that will be eligible are public or not-for-profit hospitals, rural health clinics, community health centers, health centers serving migrants, community mental health centers, local health departments or agencies, post-secondary educational institutions/teaching hospitals/medical schools, or a consortia of the above. Non-rural providers may participate in the Healthcare Connect Fund as part of a consortia, but the group must remain majority rural.

Telemedicine has demonstrated that it can drive down costs, FCC officials said. For example, in South Dakota, e-ICU services have saved eight hospitals over $1.2 million in patient transfer costs over just 30 months. In upstate New York, a network of about 50 providers expect $9 million in cost savings from providing cardiology, trauma, mental health, neurology and respiratory services over their broadband connections.

The FCC will also launch in 2014 a New Skilled Nursing Facilities Pilot Program to test how to support broadband connections for skilled nursing facilities. Funding will be up to $50 million total over a three-year period.

Posted in EHR Adoption, EHR Cloud, Electronic Health Records, EMR Cloud, incentive program, Latino health trend, Latino HIT, LISTA, LISTA Global EHR, LISTA Global EMR, LISTA Global Health IT, meaningful use, National Latino Alliance on Health Information Technology | Leave a comment

EHR Incentives Over $10B to Date

WASHINGTON | January 9, 2013

ehr_incentive_150x225Medicare and Medicaid electronic health record payments are estimated to have blasted through $10.3 billion to a total of 180,200 physicians and hospitals through December since the program’s inception. December’s payments of $1.25 billion were driven by the largest amount of hospital payments for an individual month, according to Robert Anthony, a specialist in CMS’ Office of eHealth Standards and Services.

“We will pay out in December more than $1 billion in Medicare and Medicaid hospital payments, our single largest month of payments by a factor of almost three, and a total of $1.2 billion. It will bring our year-to- date, although it’s not our program year-to-date, to over $10.3 billion paid out in incentives as of the end of December,” he said at the Jan. 8 Health IT Policy Committee meeting.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will post final figures later this month as it captures more complete data. The incentive program has been operating long enough now that some providers, specifically hospitals so far, are now return participants. So CMS lists only unique providers paid, Anthony said.

[See also: Mostashari: No cap on EHR incentive payouts.]

During December, CMS estimated that it paid 10,000 Medicare eligible physicians $175 million and 4,200 Medicaid physicians $80 million. In December, 850 hospitals under the combined programs received $1 billion, Anthony said.

Since the program’s inception through December, CMS has paid 106,000 Medicare physicians, 70,000 Medicaid physicians and 4,200 hospitals, according to CMS figures.

[See also: EHR incentives top $9B.]

The number of eligible providers registered for the EHR incentive program was 84 percent of hospitals, 43.9 percent of Medicare physicians, and 19.9 percent of Medicaid professionals signed up as of November.

This year will be significant because 2011 and 2012 were years when Medicare providers who began participation could receive full incentive payments. That won’t be the case for providers just beginning to participate in 2013, Anthony said.

“So we want to see what kind of a driver that will be,” he noted, adding that “2013 will be the deciding year for many people as far as payment adjustment.”

Just in the first few days of the year, large numbers of providers have attested. “On Jan. 2, we had 2,200 eligible professionals come in and attest, the first day after New Year’s that people could do so, which I thought was impressive, until I started to see the daily numbers afterwards, and realized that we’re starting to see those numbers virtually every day,” he said.

Anthony anticipates more smaller and rural hospitals to register to attest this year. They lack the infrastructure needed, and the regional health IT extension centers (RECs) plan to get those hospitals ready.

Some committee members inquired if there were indicators or dashboards to demonstrate if providers were realizing value from quality measures they testified to for incentives. Meaningful use sets providers on an escalator of requirements, first to capture data, then to exchange information and finally to improve health outcomes.

Posted in Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), EHR Adoption, EHR Cloud, Electronic Health Records, GE, HIT Implementation, incentive program, International News, Latino health trend, Latino HIT, LISTA, LISTA Global EHR, LISTA Global EMR, LISTA Global Health IT | Leave a comment

White House Calls for Healthcare Cuts, Permanent SGR Fix.

Obama-Health-Care-640_s640x427The White House has called for a permanent—not temporary—fix to Medicare’s sustainable growth-rate formula and about $400 billion in healthcare cuts, according to a source familiar with the fiscal-cliff negotiations.

House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio), however, was generally dismissive of the president’s new proposal, signaling that a permanent fix to the physician payment system is still not within reach.

During a news conference in the Capitol, Boehner said the GOP leadership plans to introduce a bill this week that would extend current tax rates for Americans who make $1 million or less, but Boehner stopped short of saying whether that legislation would include a temporary fix to Medicare’s physician payment formula.

Boehner told reporters that President Barack Obama’s administration offered a plan Monday that called for $1.3 trillion in new revenues and $850 billion in net spending reductions. “That is not balanced in my opinion,” Boehner said, adding that his party will continue talks with the president while it simultaneously offers a “Plan B” proposal.

Boehner’s response was vague when he was asked if the GOP proposal would encompass issues such as the Medicare physician payment formula, the alternative minimum tax and the looming funding cuts that would take place automatically in early 2013 under the Budget Control Act of 2011.

“We’re going to continue to look at how we would address those issues as we put this bill together that we would expect to put on the floor later this week,” Boehner said. “But dealing with the alternative minimum tax, dealing with the death tax, could likely be part of the bill we bring to the floor.”

Noticeably absent from that list was addressing Budget Control Act’s sequestration process, which would trigger across-the-board cuts early next year, including a 2% cut to Medicare rates.
“We would not deal with the sequester,” Boehner said.

Also not mentioned was a fix to the SGR formula. Rep. Phil Gingrey (R-Ga.), a physician who serves as co-chairman of the GOP Doctors Caucus, told Modern Healthcare that he voiced support for a Medicare physician payment fix during a GOP conference meeting that took place moments before the news conference.

“I felt very strongly that there should be a doc fix in it,” Gingrey said. “And the Speaker did not say one way or another whether there would be a doc fix in it,” he said, referring to the House plan that was discussed in the conference meeting. Gingrey said his impression was that “at least on the House side there would not be.”

Even if the House proposal does not address the SGR formula, Gingrey said he believes lawmakers will agree to a physician payment fix—likely for one year—in a final deal.

Meanwhile, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney issued a statement indicating negotiations will continue and dismissing Boehner’s “Plan B” as a proposal that could not get through the Senate.

Posted in CDC, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), CIGNA, Cloud Computing, EHR Adoption, EHR Cloud, Electronic Health Records, EMR Cloud, HIT Implementation, incentive program, International News, Latino health trend, Latino HIT, LISTA, LISTA Global EHR, LISTA Global EMR, National Latino Alliance on Health Information Technology, obama, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC), Patient Care | Leave a comment

ID Theft Scheme Hits 400+ in Louisiana and Elsewhere

ID THEFT

The health care services division of Louisiana State University, which operates seven hospitals, has notified more than 400 individuals in 12 states following the arrest of an employee charged with using patient information to make counterfeit checks, according to local media reports.

Capitol News Bureau in Baton Rouge reports that a former billing employee, Pamela Reams, printed imaged checks from a hospital financial systems database and used information such as patient names, account numbers, driver’s license numbers or Social Security numbers to make counterfeit checks and use them at stores. The names of affected individuals were found during a search of Reams’ home.

Surveillance video shows Reams making purchases with three other women, according to The Town Talk in Alexandria. Reams was charged with 377 counts of identity theft and released on $60,000 bond. All total, seven individuals were charged, according to the newspaper. As of Dec. 26, LSU had notified 416 individuals but a spokesperson told the newspaper that more could be affected.

LSU issued a public statement on Dec. 26 that gave little information, but noted the scheme is believed to have begun in January 2012 and the university received notification from law enforcement on Nov. 14. The university is not offering affected individuals free credit and identity protection services, but encourages those affected to review their bank account statements for 2012 to determine if unauthorized checks were written against an account.

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Doc-Office Use of Basic EHRs Hits Nearly 40%, Survey Finds.

Center for Disease Control and PreventionNearly 4 in 10 office-based physicians are now using an electronic health-record system with a basic level of functions, according to the latest estimates from an annual federal survey, up from about 1 in 3 a year ago.

The National Center for Health Statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has placed basic EHR adoption for office-based physicians—excluding anesthesiologist, pathologists and radiologists—in 2012 at 39.6%. That’s an increase from the 33.9% adoption rate in last year’s survey and not quite twice as high as the 21.8% EHR adoption rate found by the survey in 2009, when the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act passed, creating federal programs under Medicare and Medicaid to boost EHR adoption and their meaningful use.

At 70.6%, Wisconsin had the highest percentage of physicians using basic EHRs, followed by Minnesota, 66.7%; North Dakota, 63.2%; and Massachusetts, 61.8%. Among the states, Louisiana, at 25%, had the lowest adoption rate of basic EHRs with New Jersey, 26.9%, and Kentucky, 27.2%, just ahead of it. The District of Columbia trailed them all, however, at 22.4%.

A basic system was defined as an EHR that could be used for all of the following: record a patient history, patient demographics, problem lists, clinical notes, medications and allergies; write prescriptions; and view lab and imaging results, according to the latest NCHS data brief (PDF).

Of physicians surveyed, 2 in 3 indicated they either intended to—or already had applied for—either the Medicare or Medicaid incentives under the EHR incentive payment program.

Also in the survey report were even higher EHR adoption rates, but without qualification of what kind of EHR was being measured. According to the NCHS, when asked if they use any EHR system—and not asking them about specific system functionality—71.8% of physicians surveyed reported they did, up from 57% in the 2011 survey. In addition, according to the NCHS, 23.5% of office-based physicians reported having an EHR that meets an even more comprehensive feature set to qualify under NCHS definition as a “fully functional” EHR, up from 16.8% for a fully functional EHR in the 2011 survey.

The recently released estimates are based on a sample of 10,302 physicians who were initially mailed the survey, and then were given follow-up phone calls if they did not reply to the initial mailing. The unweighted response rate was 67%, according to the NCHS

Posted in CDC, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), CSC, HIT PRO, Latino HIT, LISTA, LISTA Global EHR, LISTA Global EMR, LISTA Global Health IT, National Latino Alliance on Health Information Technology | Leave a comment

Your Mobile Device and Health Information Privacy and Security

ONCPhysicians, health care providers and other health care professionals are using smartphones, laptops and tablets in their work. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has gathered these tips and information to help you protect and secure health information patients entrust to you when using mobile devices.

HHS listened to you. HHS conducted a Mobile Device Roundtable in March 2012 and held a 30-day public comment period to identify and gather the tips and information that would be most useful to health care providers and professionals using mobile devices in their work. You can watch the Mobile Device Roundtable for more information.

Read and Learn

The HIPAA Privacy Rule establishes national standards for giving patients the right to access and request amendment of their <!––>protected health information (PHI) as well as requesting restrictions on the use or disclosure of such information. The HIPAA Security Rule establishes a national set of security standards for the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of electronic protected health information. The HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules apply to covered entities. Covered entities include health care providers and professionals such as doctors, nurses, psychologists, dentists, and chiropractors. Individuals and organizations that meet the definition of a covered entity and who transmit health information in electronic form in connection with certain transactions must comply with the Rules’ requirements to protect the privacy and security of health information, even when using mobile devices.

Watch and Learn

NOTE: The content on the Mobile Device Privacy and Security subsection of HealthIT.gov is provided for informational purposes only and does not guarantee compliance with Federal or state laws. Please note that the information and tips presented may not be applicable or appropriate for all health care providers and professionals. We encourage providers, professionals, and organizations to seek expert advice when evaluating these tips. The Mobile Device Privacy and Security subsection of HealthIT.gov is not intended to be an exhaustive or definitive source on safeguarding health information from privacy and security risks. It is also not intended to serve as legal advice or offer recommendations based on a provider’s or professional’s specific circumstances. For more information about the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules, please visit the HHS Office for Civil Rights Health Information Privacy website.

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More Doctors E-Prescribing Via Surescripts Network, Report Says.

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT released a report finding that nearly half of U.S. physicians are sending electronic prescriptions using an electronic health record system on the Surescripts network, Government Health IT reports.

Surescripts is an electronic prescribing network used by 95% of U.S. pharmacies, excluding closed health care systems such as Kaiser Permanente.

National Findings

The report found that in June, 48% of U.S. physicians sent electronic prescriptions via the Surescripts network, a dramatic increase from the 7% of physicians who did so in December 2008 (Mosquera, Government Health IT, 11/28).

About 45% of all new and renewed prescriptions were sent electronically via the Surescripts network in 2012, the report found. It added that the total volume of new and renewed prescriptions sent via the Surescripts network has increased about ten-fold since 2008 (Bresnick, EHR Intelligence, 11/28).

The report also found that the percentage of community pharmacies equipped to receive e-prescriptions has increased from 76% in 2008 to 94% in 2012 (Perna, Healthcare Informatics, 11/28).

State-Level Findings

In 19 states, the percentage of physicians who are e-prescribing via the Surescripts network has increased by at least 50% since 2008, the report found (Goedert, Health Data Management, 11/28).

According to the report, 23 states had more than half of their physicians e-prescribing through the Surescripts network in 2012 (EHR Intelligence, 11/28).

The states with the highest percentage of physicians who were e-prescribing via the Surescripts network in 2012 are:

  • Massachusetts, at 77%;
  • New Hampshire, at 74%; and
  • Iowa, at 73% (Government Health IT, 11/28).

 

Posted in International News, Latino health trend, Latino HIT, LISTA, LISTA Global EHR, LISTA Global EMR, LISTA Global Health IT, mHealth, Mobile Health, National Latino Alliance on Health Information Technology | Leave a comment

U.S. Primary Care Doctors Making Sizeable Strides on Health IT.

 Primary care physicians in the United States and other countries are making inroads on health information technology use but continue to experience access-to-care barriers and breakdowns in coordination issues with other health care professionals, the Commonwealth Fund reported in a survey published online Nov. 15 in Health Affairs.

The survey polled nearly 8,500 primary care physicians in the U.S., Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland and the United Kingdom to gauge their health care experiences in the wake of new reforms taking effect in their countries. In tracking the technology investments, the survey found that doctors were making progress on health IT capacity, especially in the U.S.

A substantial increase was reported in the use and multifunctional capacity of health IT tools among U.S. primary care doctors over the past three years. For 2012, nearly 70% reported that they were using electronic health records, compared with 46% in 2009. “Although the United States and Canada still lag behind countries with near-universal adoption, the spread has been rapid in both countries, with a 50% increase in the rates of use of electronic medical records since 2009,” the survey stated.

Multifunctional IT use continues to progress more slowly in these two countries: Just 27% of U.S. doctors and 10% of Canadian practices reported having such capacities in their systems. Such use entails practices being able to manage patient registries, order diagnostic tests or prescriptions electronically, generate medication lists or other patient information, or send out alerts on drug interactions. Larger practices in the U.S. and at least four other countries were more likely to have multifunctional IT capacity than smaller practices.

A properly integrated EHR helps improve quality, decrease costs and assist with coordination, said Jeffrey Cain, MD, president of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Investing in this technology, however, requires time and money, and that’s a challenging prospect for primary care doctors who “are increasingly in a hand-to-mouth situation,” Dr. Cain said.

The U.S. and Canada have taken nationwide steps to boost health IT use, according to the Commonwealth Fund’s findings. In the U.S., the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has been awarding meaningful use bonuses to physicians who adopt EHRs under a provision of the 2009 federal stimulus package.

Although the study said electronic access to records by patients is growing, primary care doctors in the surveyed countries have not made as much progress on exchanging information electronically with physicians outside of their practices. Switzerland, New Zealand and the Netherlands were ahead of other nations: Half of their doctors have this capability, compared with 31% of U.S. primary care physicians.

Doctors increasingly are becoming frustrated over the need for integration across systems, Dr. Cain said. “It’s wonderful when you have this for your own office and you can have better care with your pharmacy, but if you can’t talk to your hospital across the street or with a colleague who’s a specialist down the road, then you haven’t fully benefited from having an electronic health record. We as a country need to be able to move toward that.”

The American Medical Association, in partnership with AmericanEHR Partners, founded by the American College of Physicians, is surveying its members on what they like and don’t like about the EHR systems and vendors they use.

Doctors in the 10 countries reported to the Commonwealth Fund on other challenges related to teamwork and communication. A minority of primary care physicians reported always receiving timely post-referral information from specialists, and fewer than half said they always knew about medication or care plan changes by other doctors.

Long waits to see specialists also was a concern, with U.S. doctors in particular reporting problems with obtaining timely, consistent reports about their patients from hospitals and specialists. They also were the most likely to struggle with insurance restrictions and patients not receiving needed care because of cost issues.

Family physicians spend on average of eight hours per week dealing with administrative rules for insurance companies, Dr. Cain said. “To be truly efficient, it’s important to have integrated communication and systems.”

Posted in EHR Adoption, EHR Cloud, Electronic Health Records, EMR Cloud, HIT Implementation, HIT PRO, Latino health trend, Latino HIT, LISTA, LISTA Global EHR, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) | Leave a comment

Docs Concerned about Post-Reform Payments.

The ongoing implementation of the Affordable Care Act is causing some specialist physicians to worry about what the payment environment will look like for them moving forward.

Neurologists, for example, are currently chafing under proposed cuts to their payments for certain diagnostic actions, according to The Boston Globe. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services projects it will pay about $1.6 billion for neurology services in 2013, down about 12 percent from this year.

“Medicare’s budget is under water, and they’re looking for ways to reduce payments,” Lee Schwamm, vice chairman of the Department of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital, told the newspaper. But  the “abrupt” cuts could have “significant negative consequences,” Schwamm added.

Meanwhile, primary care physicians are expected to see their reimbursement rise in 2013 as a result of the ACA, which is encouraging more preventative care, American Medical News reported. But some physicians are wary of taking on new Medicaid patients because rules to keep reimbursement on parity with Medicare may change.

“It would be risky to expand staff and make investments that would require ongoing payment bumps without the knowledge that these would be long term,” Fred Ralston, M.D., who practices in Tennessee and is a past president of the College of American Surgeons, told amednews.

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3 Effective ACO Strategies from Aetna.

It seems almost every insurer has created an accountable care organization in the past couple years since the health reform law passed, but how can they ensure the success of these payer-provider collaborations? Simply establishing an ACO doesn’t automatically improve care quality and reduce costs.

Amid the hoards of ACO arrangements popping up nationwide, Aetna has found a proven strategy toward establishing effective ACOs. “We have 68 of these ACO relationships all over the country now, and no two are identical so there’s a considerable amount of customization,” Randall Krakauer, Aetna’s national Medicare medical director, told FierceHealthPayer.

Aetna’s ACO agreement with Portland, Maine-based NovaHealth, for example, has resulted in significantly improved outcomes and lowered costs among its Medicare Advantage participating members. Thus far, Aetna’s four-year-long ACO with NovaHealth, an independent physician association, has reduced inpatient hospital days by 50 percent; cut hospital admissions by 45 percent; led to more than 99 percent of program members visiting their doctors for preventive and follow-up care; and dropped total per member, per month costs by as much as 33 percent.

But Aetna didn’t come by these results by accident. Rather, they are the product of three specific strategies–choosing the right provider partner, sharing extensive amounts of data and embedding nurse case managers–the company has implemented in its ACO with NovaHealth.

In this special report, FierceHealthPayer takes a deeper look at these three recommended strategies:

  1. Choose a provider partner with similar goals, values.When payers begin the process of establishing a new ACO, they first must select a provider partner. This is perhaps the most important decision an insurer can make because all other decisions and outcomes hinge upon the payer-provider relationship at the heart of the agreementRandall Krakauer, Aetna’s national Medicare medical director, recommended choosing a provider partner that recognizes opportunities to improve care management and is willing to take aggressive steps to achieve that goal. It’s an added benefit if the provider has been working on its own to enhance quality care and can demonstrate proven results. “We’re looking to identify groups of providers, particularly those with a considerable number of primary care physicians, that are interested in working with us to create something better, who recognize the potential for continually improving outcomes,” Krakauer said. NovaHealth, for example, “is committed to the concept of continuously improving outcomes and improving results and being able to demonstrate those. And they embrace the concept of care management and collaborating with us,” Krakauer explained.What’s more, he and other Aetna officials “hit it off very well on the very first day in the very first meeting because it was clear that our goals and plans meshed very well, and we got along very well in terms of trusting and working with each other.” Plus, Aetna and NovaHealth shared similar ideas and strategies for improving care outcomes and reducing costs–all key ingredients to ensuring an operative ACO.
  2. Share extensive, actionable data.  Another key aspect of the ACO is ensuring that doctors have the tools and information needed to effectively care for the participating members. For that reason, Aetna shares a “considerable amount of information, both immediate and actionable data, as well as summary and benchmark data” with NovaHealth, according to Randall Krakauer, Aetna’s national Medicare medical director.Through regular meetings, the insurer also provides its case management, case identification and processes to NovaHealth doctors and staff. For example, Aetna provides a hospital inpatient census to make sure NovaHealth is aware of all its patients who are hospitalized at any given time. “We also constantly analyze transactions to look for actionable gaps in care, including medical interactions that require attention,” Krakauer told FierceHealthPayer. Aetna also shares process measures, outcome measures and benchmarking information so NovaHealth can determine how its doctors are performing against quality metrics and market benchmarks. The lynchpin to all this data-sharing is Aetna’s case manager, who works directly with NovaHealth doctors to continuously act as a liaison between the insurer and the doctor practice, maintaining an open line of communication between Aetna and NovaHealth to provide any necessary information to help the providers care for members.
  3. Embed nurse care managers within provider office. When payers begin the process of establishing a new ACO, they first must select a provider partner. This is perhaps the most important decision an insurer can make because all other decisions and outcomes hinge upon the payer-provider relationship at the heart of the agreement. Randall Krakauer, Aetna’s national Medicare medical director, recommended choosing a provider partner that recognizes opportunities to improve care management and is willing to take aggressive steps to achieve that goal. It’s an added benefit if the provider has been working on its own to enhance quality care and can demonstrate proven results. “We’re looking to identify groups of providers, particularly those with a considerable number of primary care physicians, that are interested in working with us to create something better, who recognize the potential for continually improving outcomes,” Krakauer said. NovaHealth, for example, “is committed to the concept of continuously improving outcomes and improving results and being able to demonstrate those. And they embrace the concept of care management and collaborating with us,” Krakauer explained. What’s more, he and other Aetna officials “hit it off very well on the very first day in the very first meeting because it was clear that our goals and plans meshed very well, and we got along very well in terms of trusting and working with each other.” Plus, Aetna and NovaHealth shared similar ideas and strategies for improving care outcomes and reducing costs–all key ingredients to ensuring an operative ACO.
Posted in Latino health trend, Latino HIT, LISTA, LISTA Global EHR, LISTA Global EMR, LISTA Global Health IT, meaningful use, mHealth, Mobile Health, National Latino Alliance on Health Information Technology, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC), Uncategorized | Leave a comment